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Radar: Synthetic Aperture Radar Information

 

Satellite Meteorology Instructional Module

This illustrates the orbits of some of the satellites used for remote sensing. There is also a short section describing how to interpret satellite images used for weather. Be sure to take some of the links within the text as these are often hooked to images that help explain the concepts better. Teachers can order a CD-ROM for $7.00 here that has several lessons and a lot of weather data on it. One of the modules on the CD has to do with satellite imaging. They have reproduced a few of the lessons online (Archives/Case Studies).

Geography Standard 1: Understands the characteristics and use of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
Physical Science Standard 9: Understands the sources and properties of energy
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


Seeing Earth's Surface in 3-D

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory provides accurate information about how synthetic aperture radar (SAR) works when deployed from the Space Shuttle.

Geography Standard 1: Understands the characteristics and use of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
Physical Science Standard 9: Understands the sources and properties of energy
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


Remote Sensing Introduction and History

An interesting and easy-to-read description of remote sensing. Turn the glossary on if you need it. Access to lots of remote images here also.

Geography Standard 1: Understands the characteristics and use of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


Remote Sensing Principles

A tutorial that focuses on remote study of the Chesapeake Bay area. Somewhat more technical than the previous site, but a good introduction for older students.

Geography Standard 1: Understands the characteristics and use of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


Using Satellite RADAR Imagery to Study the Polar Regions

Another site offered by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this site is aimed toward middle school students and the general public. Very easy to understand. A good introduction to the topic.

Geography Standard 1: Understands the characteristics and use of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies
Physical Science Standard 9: Understands the sources and properties of energy
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


How Does Imaging Radar Work?

Another site offered by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this site is aimed toward middle school students and the general public. Very easy to understand. A good introduction to the topic.


Physical Science Standard 9: Understands the sources and properties of energy
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual


How Radar Works

From the How Stuff Works folks, this short tutorial provides basic information about a number of different applications of radar and how they work. The graphics are good and make it easy to understand, once students master how to navigate in this complex site. They need to use the links on the right in the story to see the different sections.


Physical Science Standard 9: Understands the sources and properties of energy
Technology Standard 3: Understands the relationship among science, technology, society, and the individual

 


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Quick Peek!
 

 

 


 
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Quick Fact!
  SAR stands for synthetic aperture radar. Radar sends out a pulse of radio waves which bounces off the object to be depicted. Then the scattered pulses return to the radar, where they are captured by the receiving antenna. The antenna is the radar's aperture. Learn more about how this works by reading the material and looking at the graphics provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  
 
 
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